Auditing as a career

August 28, 2004 on R3X Course

From: "Robert D."
Date: Sat Aug 28, 2004 3:53 pm
Subject: Auditing as a career

Many people got trained in the church for the purpose of devoting their lives to a career in the field of Scn as an auditor. Unfortunately the church experience has been a bitter disappointment for most. And we see very few of these people practicing their craft in the free zone.

The main reasons for this include:

1. Disinterest in the subject,
2. Preferred interest in other areas, like family, higher-paying jobs/careers, etc.,
3. Fear of the church's influence,
4. Ignorance regarding marketing,
5. State laws regarding counseling,
6. An inability to achieve 100% reliable results on their clients.

Numbers 1 and 2 are understandable. Some people don't like auditing just like some don't like art or engineering while others do. Some would rather be involved in a "real world" profession that has already gained acceptance and automatically pays high salaries. Some simply don't like the idea of dealing with peoples' cases.

Number 3 is understandable from the standpoint that one's close friends and loved ones may be involved directly with the church and one would rather remain "in the closet" regarding free zone activities in order to not jeopardize those relationships. I consider personal freedom a high price to pay for maintained relations, but it's that individual's choice to make for his own reasons.

As far as fear of retaliation by the church for "squirrel" activities is concerned, well, I suppose that tends to happen only in areas heavily populated with Scios (with a capital "S") like Los Angeles. I don't know how founded these fears are, but I would tend to look for some way out of that box and "start living".

Number 4 is also understandable. An auditor on his own has to pull himself up by his own bootstraps, pushing a profession that has little agreement in the wog world. But there are enough scios (with a small "s") outside the church alone to provide one with clientele. But there is also a proliferation of publications that are tailor made for an auditor to pitch his trade. Such magazines as the ubiquitous pulp new age and health magazines, some of which are distributed free, are possible avenues of advertisement. The practice of bringing a resolution to a troubled mind is a valid, valuable and a viable one. The more people find out about it, the more viable it will become in time.

Number 5 should not become an impediment. In Florida we are fortunate that counseling laws are liberal. Anyone can legally call himself a counselor. In some states one must meet certain educational criteria and be certified by the state to call himself a counselor and charge a fee. An option is to become a minister and come under the cloak of religion. The Universal Life Church offers ministerial certificates on demand.

Number 6 has unfortunately been a valid impediment -- that is until the advent of R3X.

What R3X does is to open the doors to the possibility of running Dianetic counseling on anyone and everyone with equal success. No, not equal results, but equal degree of success. In other words, the tech IS so standard that it applies to everyone across the board whether they have had set-up procedures or not; whether they are non-Scios, intermediate Scios, or pre-OTs.

As LRH once said in HCOB 7 April 1960, "Engram running from 'away back' works so well that I probably would not have advanced auditing technically to any degree, if people at large had been able to apply Book One engram running as given in 1950." Of course LRH was missing a few factors that could have brought that about, like havingness, a rote basic procedure, debugging techniques, engram running by chains, TRs, metering, admin, a standard course with checksheet, and study tech.

So now one can achieve results with R3X that are as predictable as those of a dentist or optometrist. It's up to us as to how widespread we want the knowledge of Dianetic counseling as an acceptable professional practice to become.

Robert D.